Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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Chris Tepedino is a feature writer that has written extensively about auto insurance for numerous websites. He has a college degree in communication from the University of Tennessee and has experience reporting, researching investigative pieces, and crafting detailed, data-driven features. His works have been featured on CB Blog Nation, Flow Words, Healing Law, WIBW Kansas, and Cinncinati....

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Reviewed by Chris Tepedino
Feature Writer

UPDATED: May 28, 2021

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The Full Review

  • On average, full coverage auto insurance costs $79 per month or $950 annually.
  • Full coverage auto insurance consists of liability coverage, comprehensive coverage, and collision coverage.
  • Additional policies may be included in your full coverage auto insurance, like roadside assistance.

Have you ever asked yourself,  “Do I need full coverage auto insurance?” Followed by, “Wait, what does full coverage auto insurance consist of anyway?” and, “What does full coverage cover on a car?” Read our comprehensive guide to find out the answers to these questions and when to have full coverage auto insurance on your vehicle.

What is the best coverage for auto insurance? It will change depending on your unique needs. Keep reading to unpack full coverage auto insurance vs. other insurance options to find the right policy for you. Affordable full coverage auto insurance isn’t out of reach.

Secure the best basic full coverage auto insurance by entering your five-digit ZIP code into our FREE quote comparison tool.

What is considered full coverage insurance on a car?

Is your auto insurance full coverage or not? What does full coverage auto insurance mean? Don’t worry; we’re here to help.

You’ve probably heard the terms full auto coverage and high coverage insurance before. But, what does full coverage auto insurance consist of? 

A full-coverage definition is hard to come by. That’s because there really is no set definition. What one company considers full coverage vehicle insurance may not be the same as what another company is offering. 

But what is a basic full coverage definition? Usually, the term full coverage means some combination of liability coverage, comprehensive coverage, and collision coverage. 

However, there may also be other specialty offerings, such as roadside assistance or pet coverage, included in full coverage automobile insurance.

How much does full coverage insurance cost? The following table provides estimated annual full coverage auto insurance rates by state. Find where you live below. 

Average Annual Full Coverage Insurance Rates by State
StatesAverage Annual Full Coverage Auto Insurance Rates
Idaho$673.13
Iowa$683.67
Maine$689.12
Wisconsin$716.83
Indiana$728.93
South Dakota$744.28
Vermont$746.79
Ohio$766.66
North Dakota$768.09
North Carolina$768.28
New Hampshire$795.50
Nebraska$805.99
Virginia$836.14
Alabama$837.09
Wyoming$844.33
Missouri$845.39
Kansas$850.79
Utah$852.66
Illinois$854.10
Tennessee$855.56
Minnesota$856.62
Hawaii$858.16
Montana$868.55
Oregon$894.10
Arkansas$900.18
Kentucky$917.49
New Mexico$920.42
South Carolina$936.69
Colorado$939.52
Pennsylvania$950.42
California$951.75
Washington$952.10
Mississippi$957.59
Arizona$961.88
Oklahoma$985.58
Georgia$991.25
West Virginia$1,032.45
Alaska$1,050.09
Texas$1,066.20
Nevada$1,083.42
Maryland$1,096.37
Massachusetts$1,107.76
Connecticut$1,132.78
Florida$1,208.77
Delaware$1,215.69
Rhode Island$1,257.40
Michigan$1,264.20
District of Columbia$1,324.39
New York$1,327.82
Louisiana$1,364.17
New Jersey$1,379.20
U.S. Average$943.80
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So, how much is full coverage insurance? The cost changes based on where you live. 

When the time comes to purchase an auto insurance policy, you obviously want to look for the best deal. This is a bit tricky because you need to weigh not only the price but also what is offered for that price. Fortunately, you can secure the cheapest full coverage auto insurance by comparison shopping.

Understanding what you want from a policy will allow you to purchase the appropriate coverage. By understanding what’s offered by different full coverage auto insurance policies, you’ll be better prepared to get the right policy for your needs.

There’s a lot of full coverage insurance information out there. The easiest way to approach this subject is to simply break down the different types of policies that are typically a part of the full coverage insurance definition. Keep reading.

Liability vs. Full Coverage Auto Insurance

Is liability full coverage? Or, to rephrase the question, are liability and full coverage the same? No, they are two different policies. Liability coverage is what will pay for damages that are a direct result of an accident you’re responsible for, including damages you cause to another vehicle, other damaged property such as a building or fence, and any bodily injury that is a result of the accident.

This type of coverage is required by law in order to register a vehicle. Each state has specific requirements as far as liability coverage limits are concerned. The coverage limits are usually expressed in the following format: 50/100/25, which translates to $50,000 for bodily injury per person, $100,000 for bodily injury per accident, and $25,000 for property damage per accident.

Find your state’s average annual cost for liability insurance in the table below.

Average Annual Liability Auto Insurance Rates by State
StatesAverage Annual Liability Auto Insurance Rates
North Dakota$298.18
Iowa$299.18
South Dakota$300.22
Wyoming$321.04
Maine$338.87
Vermont$343.12
Idaho$344.29
Kansas$358.24
North Carolina$359.42
Nebraska$364.64
Wisconsin$374.37
Indiana$382.68
Montana$386.29
Arkansas$394.13
Alabama$394.21
Ohio$397.11
New Hampshire$400.56
Tennessee$413.91
Missouri$415.88
Virginia$425.61
Illinois$446.72
Minnesota$456.82
Hawaii$458.54
Mississippi$460.50
Oklahoma$461.01
New Mexico$488.03
California$489.66
West Virginia$491.83
Utah$497.53
Pennsylvania$499.06
Arizona$508.76
Colorado$520.04
South Carolina$527.09
Texas$528.75
Kentucky$529.21
Alaska$539.68
Georgia$557.38
Oregon$584.13
Washington$596.67
Massachusetts$606.04
Maryland$609.74
District of Columbia$628.82
Connecticut$650.94
Nevada$681.56
Rhode Island$759.80
Louisiana$775.83
Michigan$795.32
Delaware$799.30
New York$804.51
Florida$857.64
New Jersey$869.57
U.S. Average$538.73
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This type of coverage applies to any accident for which you are determined to be liable; the determination will ultimately be made by your insurance company, not the police.

If you’re asking if it is better to have full coverage or liability, you should keep in mind that there is a price difference between full coverage and liability insurance. To lower your rates, you can purchase liability only, but you won’t be covered in every situation.

Also, liability minimum limits are generally quite low and by no means an ideal amount of coverage to have.

Is comprehensive insurance the same as full coverage?

Does full coverage include comprehensive? Before we answer this question, we have to clearly define the two terms. A lot of consumers wonder, is comprehensive full coverage insurance? Some people even assume they are synonyms. 

So, is full coverage and comprehensive the same thing? No, they are two different policies. The easiest way to describe this coverage is that if your vehicle is not moving and it gets damaged, comprehensive coverage kicks in.

For example, if your car is parked in your driveway and a tree branch falls on it, comprehensive coverage would pay for the resulting damage. This is considered to be first-party insurance coverage, as it is intended to cover the insured party’s assets.

See how much comprehensive insurance costs annually in your state in the table below.

Average Annual Comprehensive Auto Insurance by State
StatesAverage Annual Comprehensive Auto Insurance Rates
Oregon$93.87
California$100.54
Hawaii$101.56
Maine$104.98
Washington$106.38
Utah$109.50
New Hampshire$110.77
Florida$116.53
Idaho$116.55
Nevada$117.63
Ohio$121.61
Indiana$122.06
Delaware$122.49
Vermont$125.48
Illinois$128.13
New Jersey$131.35
Connecticut$131.62
Rhode Island$132.19
Massachusetts$134.96
North Carolina$136.08
Virginia$136.54
Wisconsin$136.81
Alaska$137.26
Kentucky$141.39
Pennsylvania$144.21
Tennessee$148.45
Maryland$152.72
Michigan$154.85
Alabama$156.31
Georgia$159.18
New York$171.12
New Mexico$172.57
Colorado$174.61
South Carolina$180.94
Missouri$181.27
Iowa$183.53
Minnesota$184.27
Arizona$186.12
Arkansas$190.41
West Virginia$204.28
Texas$206.42
Mississippi$210.33
Montana$211.91
Louisiana$215.17
Oklahoma$225.84
Nebraska$229.25
North Dakota$231.04
District of Columbia$233.24
Wyoming$247.57
South Dakota$258.11
Kansas$267.91
Countrywide$160.74
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There is usually a deductible that the insured party will need to pay, which can range from $250 to $1,000 or more.  This is generally less expensive than collision coverage as there are fewer incidents of this type.

So, is comprehensive insurance included in full coverage auto insurance? Yes, it usually is. 

Is comprehensive and collision considered full coverage auto insurance when purchased together? Not exactly. Remember, liability is also included in this type of policy. Therefore, there is a difference between full coverage vs. comprehensive and collision insurance.

Is collision full coverage auto insurance?

Collision coverage generally includes any damages to your car that result from an accident when your vehicle is in motion. For example, if you are driving your car and run into a light pole in a parking lot, this would be paid for under your collision coverage.

In an annual report, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration documented 6,734,000 motor vehicle crashes in 2018. Collision coverage is therefore highly recommended for drivers.  

This is first-party coverage that also requires the payment of a deductible in the event of a covered accident.  The deductible will usually be between $250-$1,000 or more, depending on the policy. 

Find the average annual rates for collision insurance in your state in the following table.

Average Annual Collision Auto Insurance Rates by State
StatesAverage Annual Collision Auto Insurance Rates
South Dakota$208.58
Idaho$219.05
Iowa$219.75
Wisconsin$226.00
Oregon$226.83
Minnesota$234.40
Nebraska$237.13
North Dakota$244.09
Indiana$250.29
Maine$259.98
Kansas$263.33
South Carolina$265.07
Montana$265.32
Washington$265.74
Utah$265.90
Kentucky$267.91
Ohio$269.84
Missouri$275.28
New Mexico$276.98
Arizona$277.96
Wyoming$278.83
Virginia$280.52
Florida$282.96
Colorado$287.00
North Carolina$293.59
Vermont$295.42
Nevada$303.86
New Hampshire$307.42
Tennessee$309.07
Illinois$309.71
Hawaii$313.17
Alabama$317.96
Oklahoma$318.47
Delaware$318.77
Arkansas$321.80
Mississippi$323.22
Pennsylvania$327.24
West Virginia$329.67
Georgia$331.83
Alaska$350.81
Maryland$353.99
Connecticut$368.51
Texas$374.49
New Jersey$381.86
New York$385.02
Massachusetts$388.28
California$396.55
Rhode Island$411.51
Michigan$413.83
Louisiana$414.36
District of Columbia$468.67
U.S. Average$322.61
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Collision coverage will pay to have your vehicle repaired, or in the event it is totaled, it will pay the actual cash value of the vehicle.

So terms like full collision coverage are a little misleading because, in the event of a totaled vehicle, the actual cash value determined by insurance providers is usually less than what you paid for the vehicle, due to depreciation.

The actual cash value is also determined by the price similar model and year vehicles have sold for in your area.

However, there are some collision policies that state that if your vehicle is less than a year old, insurance will pay the cost to buy a new one instead of paying the actual cash value, which is generally far less.

Full Coverage Insurance Minimum

Terms like minimum full coverage insurance don’t really mean anything. There are no general full coverage auto insurance requirements. If you choose to get full coverage auto insurance, let’s say it’s Geico full coverage, then your policy will be whatever Geico markets as full coverage auto insurance.

There is no standard minimum or maximum full coverage insurance meaning. 

If you purchase Nationwide full coverage auto insurance, the policy labeled as Nationwide’s full coverage auto insurance definition will probably have different options. The same goes for what is considered full coverage auto insurance with Progressive.

So, what is minimum full coverage auto insurance? Any policy that includes liability, collision, and comprehensive insurance. 

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Do I really need full coverage auto insurance?

Now that you know what full coverage auto insurance covers, let’s discuss why you might need to invest in this type of coverage.

What does having full coverage insurance mean? Full coverage insurance includes liability, comprehensive, and collision protection in your policy. But many other types of coverages can also be added. 

The following video from eHowFinance discusses full coverage auto insurance. What does it cover? Watch to find out.

But when should you get full coverage auto insurance? If you own your vehicle outright, but cannot afford to replace it in the event that it gets totaled, you should consider purchasing this type of coverage.

How much is full coverage for a car? It changes depending on where you live and your unique demographics, but it will likely cost more than your state’s minimum requirement for auto insurance. 

For example, teenagers are known as high-risk drivers, as they are statistically more likely to get into an accident. According to the Center for Disease Control, car accidents are one of the leading causes of death for teens in America. 

Therefore, full coverage insurance may exceed the budget of younger drivers. If you’re looking for auto insurance for teenagers, full coverage policies may not be the most affordable option. 

The full coverage auto insurance company you buy from will also impact your rates. Is full coverage auto insurance with Progressive cheaper than Geico or Nationwide? The best way to find out for sure is to get full coverage auto insurance quotes from multiple insurers. 

Keep reading to learn more about what’s included in full coverage auto insurance and when it’s required.

When is full coverage insurance required?

While no states legally require you to purchase full coverage auto insurance, some dealerships require you to purchase this type of policy if you lease a vehicle through them. 

Requirements for full coverage auto insurance will vary depending on what dealership you use. Because the coverage included in the state minimum standards for auto insurance will not replace a totaled lease vehicle, dealerships require full coverage insurance as a way to protect their assets. 

Is state minimum insurance full coverage?

So, is state minimum full coverage? Unfortunately, no it is not. State minimum full coverage insurance does not exist.

Typical auto insurance coverage limits vary by state because each state has legal minimum requirements. Often, state minimum requirements are not enough to give you a decent level of coverage. 

Purchasing what classifies as full coverage insurance is a great way to fix that issue. But remember, specific full coverage insurance requirements don’t exist, which is why there is a lot of ambiguity when dealing with the term. 

How to Know if You Have Full Coverage Insurance

But how do I know if I have full coverage insurance? Just look at your policy, or ask your insurance agent. 

If you have no full coverage insurance but are interested in purchasing some, remember to shop around. What is considered full coverage changes from company to company, but all will include liability, collision, and comprehensive coverage. 

When it comes to full coverage, insurance companies will also charge different rates. So be sure to do some comparison shopping before choosing a policy. 

Benefits of Full Coverage Auto Insurance

Now that you understand how to know if your insurance is full coverage, let’s discuss the benefits of what full coverage auto insurance will cover.

Remember, what constitutes full coverage insurance is a combination of liability, comprehensive, and collision insurance. Some companies may also include roadside assistance programs or windshield replacement. 

How does full coverage insurance work? It covers almost any type of accident or collision, meaning you’ll be able to file a claim with your insurance company to help cover any losses you may experience. 

From dents caused by a bad hail storm to getting rear-ended at a stoplight, full automobile coverage protects you in virtually every scenario. 

What happens if you don’t have full coverage on a financed car?

You might be wondering, do I need full coverage on a financed car? Remember, full coverage on a car is never legally required. But what is included in a typical insurance policy usually is not enough to protect the total value of a leased vehicle in the event of an accident.

Keep in mind, you may need to purchase full coverage auto insurance from some dealerships if you plan on leasing, depending on their policies. 

If your financed car gets totaled and you still owe on the auto loan, you have to pay it back even though the vehicle is no longer drivable. 

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Frequently Asked Questions: What does full coverage auto insurance consist of?

You can now define full coverage auto insurance like a professional. Not only do you understand how to get full coverage insurance, but you also know when to get full coverage auto insurance. 

Refer back to our guide while you comparison shop for your best rates. In the meantime, check out our frequently asked questions below.

Find out how much full coverage auto insurance will cost you by entering your five-digit ZIP code into our FREE quote comparison tool to buy full coverage auto insurance near you.

#1 – What is considered full coverage auto insurance in Colorado?

What is considered full coverage in Colorado? It will include liability, comprehensive, and collision coverage. Depending on which company you buy from, the coverage limits will vary. 

#2 – What is full coverage insurance in Georgia?

What does full coverage insurance mean in Georgia? It will include liability, comprehensive, and collision coverage. The definition will change depending on what insurance company you buy from. 

#3 – What is full coverage insurance in Indiana?

What is considered full coverage auto insurance in Indiana? It will include liability, comprehensive, and collision coverage. Whatever company you buy from will have different definitions. 

#4 – What is full coverage insurance in Oklahoma?

What’s considered full coverage auto insurance in Oklahoma will vary depending on what company you buy a policy from. However, it will include liability, comprehensive, and collision coverage.

#5 – What is full coverage insurance in Oregon?

What is typical full coverage auto insurance in Oregon? That depends on what company you choose to purchase a policy from. Know that it will include liability, comprehensive, and collision coverage.

#6 –What is considered full coverage auto insurance in Tennessee?

What’s included in full coverage auto insurance in Tennessee will change depending on what company provides you with a policy. It will, however, include liability, comprehensive, and collision coverage.

#7 – Do I need full coverage insurance?

Do you have to have full coverage? No, but it might be worth investing in. Use a full coverage insurance calculator to estimate your rates. 

References

  1. https://cdan.nhtsa.gov/tsftables/tsfar.htm
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/teen_drivers/teendrivers_factsheet.html